Thoughts on School District Practices

Two seats are open for the November 2018 election. Last year’s candidates spoke about testing, teacher retention and academic achievement.

My thoughts:
1. Testing. Standardized testing is a money maker under the guise of being an assessment to ensure students are learning content. There is no application component. We are not teaching our students to be complex thinkers. We are giving them practice in being assembly line “yes” people. True assessment, called authentic assessment, includes students presenting portfolios and research-action projects.

2. Teacher retention. The assessments created for rating teachers is also not authentic. The National Board Certification process is more thorough, but even then, it is a series of hoops to jump through, to be eligible for a bonus check in October. Are there some reasonable and useful components? Yes. But to have been a teacher in the classroom for 20 years, kneel down to speak with a student on hownto improve their writing, and then to be marked down on an evaluation for not recognizing student needs? Absolutely ridiculous and frustrating for the teacher. How do we increase teacher retention? We treat them as professionals. We give them the ability to use personal days and sick days as mental health days. We give them the ability to donate sick days to colleagues. We give them the ability to purchase products through “non-approved vendors” like second hand stores where you can get a steal on previously owned items. We give them student aides and foster grandparents for classrooms. We support them when they send a student out of the classroom. We give them time for properly preparing for their lessons. We give them professional development opportunities over the summer in areas of interest, in partnership with Universities, to earn continuing education units. We give them opportunities to advance in their teaching posts. We provide support people — translators, counselors, aides, tech support. We listen to teachers’ ideas.

3. Academic Achievement. Learning how to fill in a bubble is easy. And boring. We must challenge our students. We must listen to their interests. We must be teacher facilitated, and student centered. We must not only focus on STEM programs, but we must also provide home economics, social and political awareness and engagement, community projects. We must commit to helping our children become complex thinkers, self-motivated learners, effective communicators, responsible citizens, able to work with their community, and research the better solutions. We must commit to teaching and modeling compassion and empathy. We must commit to common sense, outside the box, inside the box, no box, individual perspectives. We must help our students understand that we are each a piece of this puzzle of life.

Viva! (La revolucion)
❤ Felicia
#DontThrowTheBabyOutWithTheBathWater #LearnFromMistakes #LetsGo

Reflections on CPARB and TPD

I served on the Citizen Police Advisory Review Board (CPARB) for four years beginning in 2011, first as a non-voting advisory member, then a regular member, then the vice-chair, and the chair.

As a member of CPARB, I learned a lot about the Tucson Police Department (TPD) — its successes, and its needs.  I learned about the Chain of Command, the disciplinary matrix, and what it was like to be on duty (Board Members were required to participate in two ride-alongs per year).

I learned about the equipment, the resources, and the facilities.

I learned that the Department is understaffed and overworked.

This was all significant to me becaue I had personal experiences with TPD — both positive, and negative.

As a volunteer member of the Board (all members are volunteers), I reviewed an average of three closed internal review cases per month (selected by the Chairperson of the Board), attended monthly meetings, participated in ride-alongs, and monthly dialogues with a senior member of TPD.

Because of my personal beliefs that there should be increased transparency, I identified additional ways to let members of the Community know about meetings, and the existence of the Board,  by creating a Pro-active Outreach Possibilities (or “POP”) sub-committee.

I also worked to have reports included on the CPARB website, and ensured the website was updated with current contact information.

And I worked to educate community members about the importance of providing compliments and complaints to TPD.

As an educator of 25 years, who uses restorative practices and continuous improvement strategies and techniques I believe it is important to thank and compliment others, and also to follow processes for developing new habits for unsafe behaviors.

My hope is for the following:

1. The Citizen Police Academy returns and is available to the public;

2. Increased involvement and relationship building between officers and the community;

3. Increased use of the online compliments and complaints system;

4. Increased and continuous transparency of TPD;

5  Understanding that TPD is a piece of the puzzle for a happier, healthier, safer community, and work towards making it so.

Lesson Twenty-One. Save Fourth Ave

https://www.facebook.com/groups/savefourthave/

Part of what makes Tucson what it is?  Its funkiness.  We can promote economic development while keeping the funkiness amd uniqueness of #OurTucson.

The “easy” way is to build in 4th Ave.

The better way is to connect the rest of Tucson to 4th Ave and Downtown areas through an improved transit system, and better quality of living in *all* of Tucson.

How?  Focus on:
– In-fill
– Increased community participation
– Family events
– Funky art and music

Look at the reports shared recently about our city overall (some good, lots bad)

Bring “the bottom” up, and make things better for all of us, not just some of us.

**IMPORTANT CLARIFICATION: This does not mean “handouts”, or those darned safety pins (which are TEMPORARY fixes).  I am sorry for those of you who I have offended.  We do the best that we can.  It is time to stop letting others control us, and take control of our lives.

This means getting to THE ROOT of the problem, and asking questions like:

– why do some people think it is okay to beat their partner?

– why do some people think it is okay to belittle or demean someone of “lower stature”?

– why do some people think it is okay to litter?

– why do some people think it is okay to say “That’s not my job!”

– why do some people think it is okay to drastically change the culture of our community and neighborhood through excuses, excuses, excuses, and overtures of being the benevolent leaders?

It is time to #SpeakUp, say #Enough, and #FindTheRootToTheProblem.  It is time to #DoTheRightThing!

#StopJustifying #StopGentrification #StopClassism #StopBeingAJerk #StopSayingItIsNotPossible #BeTheChange #MakeTheDifference #ThatOneStarfish #MeanPeopleSuck #WakeUp #GetMAD #BeSMART #MeToo #OurTucson #OurStory #OurFuture #EachOfUs #AllOfUs #ChewForTucson #NOW #NAACP #ThisAffectsAllOfUs #OARP #LookBeyond #OurChildrenAreWatching #RealSocialServices  #IUsedTooManyTags

Viva! (la revolucion)
❤ Felicia
Chewfortucson.wordpress.com

What Does a Bill Look Like?

Here is the updated draft of the bill for Domestic Violence – Coercive Control and Child Welfare.

The entire sections are included as is. Additions are in ALL CAPITALS and deletions are struck through. Additions are also in blue for easier viewing online or with color machines.

20180122_09044720180122_09051220180122_09364720180122_09373120180122_09423020180122_09425120180122_09434320180122_09442720180122_09444420180122_09480420180122_09491120180122_094928


“We are each a piece of the puzzle of life.  Without each of us, our picture is incomplete.”


http://www.feliciachew.com/dvssarticles

How can we protect survivors of domestic abuse – coercive control?

LEGISLATION.
a. Add coercive control as a crime. Work with local law enforcement to determine the language is appropriate.

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2. THERAPY/COUNSELING.
a. No contact with the victim until the required DV coercive control counseling/therapy sessions are completed (top of page 3, Items B-F).

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b. Family/Support Persons Therapy. Not just for the victim and the abuser, but also for the siblings, parents, and support persons… so they can be aware of what domestic violence coercion control looks like, and when it is being committed.

c. Victim Therapy. Exists, but can be cost prohibitive to victim.

3. FINANCIAL. It is necessary to include that the abuser must contribute to household expenses by being able to continue to go to work, to pay for bills, etc., or some other source of funding must exist, otherwise the victim cannot survive.

a. The creation of an “escrow account” that convicted offenders must pay into, especially for those who have children. The funds in this account are for use if/when the abuser is arrested again, to pay for rent, electricity/gas, water, basic phone service, car insurance and payments, and had to transport children to school and activities. How this is presented to the abuser is important, and awareness that the abuser is likely to become resentful at some point, or refuse to participate because of the lack of control. So it is important to emphasize that this is a future emergency fund, not simply a punishment. Would be nice if this contributes to credit score ratings.

b. The victim can also have an option to have a separate “escrow account”. Even better if it can somehow be counted to improving the credit ratings of the victim.

4. CHILD SAFETY AND WELFARE.
a. Parent in custody change to legislation. Addressed in draft at the bottom of page 6 and on page 7.

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b. Child testimony change to legislation. Addressed on page 6

5. VICTIM SAFETY
a. Victim Testimony change to legislation. Addressed on pages 5 and 6

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b. Victim Contact change to legislation. Page 5

Five to Fight For

Original post on September 3, 2017

Hello Friends!

Now that the Felicia Chew For Tucson City Council campaigning is timed out, what next?

For me, I keep keeping on.

After the official ballot counts were posted on Friday (9/1/2017) night, my son and I attended one of my best friend’s* weddings on Friday night here at Tucson’s Fraternal Order of Eagles Tucson Aerie Number 180.

I was reminded that we have choices, and that we can make change — and I was reminded of why I fight — for our future and our future generations.

Tucson, it’s up to us to help continue the fight. Here are five issues (there are others) I learned about while on this wonderful adventure, along with my two cents:

1. Tucson House. Please bring back human beings for entry rights (signing everyone in and out), instead of the computerized entry system. Folks who don’t belong are finding their way into the building, and causing problems for residents. Longtime residents no longer feel safe.

2. Bicycle Patrols. Please implement programs directed toward reducing crime in Ward 3. The District has officers on bicycle; areas of Ward 3 (like my area of Campus Farm, and the Samos Neighborhood), would definitely appreciate some bicycle patrols. Pilot program, for TPD?

3. N 1st Ave and Fort Lowell (Methadone Clinic). Many general complaints. My thoughts: All of us in Ward 3 need to realize that clients of the Clinic attend for various reasons, and we should not judge our fellow Tucsonans for attending the Clinic. We should suppprt them and their decision to attempt to take back their lives, by participating in treatment.

4. Vote By Mail Program/Voter Participation. The Vote By Mail (VBM) program is not equitable (please see my previous comments on this page). But more importantly, many Ward 3 residents don’t vote — for a variety of reasons:

–(a) Cannot vote — no rights due to previous felonies or citizenship status; not registered to vote because they are part-time residents, or just moved;

–(b) Do not know it is time to vote — busy with daily life (and dealing with crises and mini-crises) and time just gets away, including the voting window;

–(c) Do not care to vote — a huge “It won’t make a difference”/”No one cares what I think”/”Why bother? The City (Government) is just going to do what it wants to do. They don’t care what we say” sentiment exists.

–(d) Don’t feel educated to vote. Despite attempts at hosting many forums, and providing newspaper coverage, many voters were not able to attend or view the forums.**

The largest turnouts were 75 or 80 audience members (many groupies).

Voter turnout for the City: 20%.
— One out of 3 (33%) women will experience Domestic Violence in her lifetime;
— One out of four (25%) men will experience Domestic Violence in his lifetime;
— One out of four Tucsonans (25%) lives in poverty (http://www.kvoa.com/story/33283962/tucson-poverty-rate-relatively-unchanged-over-three-years)

So, the 20% voter population (one out of five) does not speak to the general population (please bear in mind that Ward 3 has one of the highest numbers of reported cases of Domestic Violence).

As a Victim Advocate in the Courts, we advocate for the victim speaking, to share the true story and true problems that exist. In spite of how hard others may try to speak “for” the victim/survivor, there are gaps that frequently get overlooked, simply because it is hard work to communicate everything the victim/survivor has to say.

So please — have conversations with neighbors to develop a trust that is so sorely needed in our community!

My two cents: An olde town monthly fiesta that included Candidate and Issues Forums, food, information about what’s going on in Tucson, food trucks, music, food, speeches by candidates, food, games for all ages, food — Tucson, that could go a long way. Tucsonans like (love!) Festivals and Second Saturdays!

5. Transit, Transportation, and Walkability. I was asked at a Forum how I rated Walkability in Ward 3. I gave ratings across the board (because quite frankly, some areas in Ward 3 have more improvements than others — areas due to Resident Action and Participation).

We are improving, but we need to continue improving our transit system, fewer potholes, more bicycle lanes, and more pedestrian (and skateboard, longboard, roller skate, wheelchair, stroller, limited mobility) friendly paths.

*****

Kalamajong***, Tucson! Viva! (La revolucion!)

Felicia 🙂 ❤

*Amber and Raymond, go make your luck!)
**Shout out to Daily Star Reporter Joe Ferguson who was at all but two that I attended; and shout out to groups who livestreamed /recorded the forums — Forums and recordings available on the Campaign site chewfortucson.wordpress.com — You can create your own free website at wordpress.com
***Make it so!

Summer Meal Programs Reinstated

“As Councilwoman, going to work would mean advocating for, and ensuring City Programs to be implemented the way they were intended to work for you.”

*****

KIDCO is a fantastic program.  The summer program is one of the most affordable programs in town, and the staff is energetic and involved with the kids.

Over the summer, the KIDCO Summer Meal Program was cut.  After contacting KIDCO and Tucson Unified School District Food Services (who was contracted by ADE to provide the meals), I was informed that the program had been cut by ADE, due to sites not meeting the required minimum number of participants.

Realizing that many of the sites would not be able to meet the minimum number requirement, and this requirement was standing in the way of the intent of the program, I reached out to ADE, hoping to inquire about an alternative participant count option — having sites grouped together for the count — but when my phone calls were not returned, I reached out to Tucson News Now.

With Angelica’s help, the meal program was re-instated.  Through persistence, having conversations, and thinking outside the box, we were able to provide healthy meals to participants, and assist families through providing breakfast and lunch to their children.

The story doesn’t end there.  I hoped that my son would be able to attend the KIDCO after school program.  Unfortunately, there is no transportation from his school to the program site.  I began communicating with Parks and Rec, and SunVan, who was interested in starting a pilot program, but was unable to continue with the process due to having to return to work.

As Councilwoman, going to work would mean advocating for, and ensuring City Programs to be implemented the way they were intended to work for you.

When the time comes to vote, know that a vote for Chew is a vote for you!

#EachOfUs #AllOfUs #OurTucson #ChewForWard3Council #ChewForTucson

 

1700

On August 29, 2017, 1700 voters cast a “Yes” vote for me, Felicia Chew, for Ward 3 Councilwoman.

1700 votes for programs that connect working families, and each of us, with local government; for stronger public services, especially​ improved public ​transit;

1700 votes for​ a more economically and environmentally sustainable Tucson;

1700 votes for a community that is healthy and strong for each of us, for all of us, and our future generations;

Those 1700 voices are not going unheard. Felicia Chew Community Projects was founded on November 22, 2017 to continue the work.

If the 1700 voters are joined with others who were ineligible to vote in the election, and each individual contributes $2/month or $20/year to Felicia Chew Community Projects, we will be able to continue the work I spoke of, for our community.

We will increase the number of voters from 8000 who are likely to vote.

We will raise our median income.

We will reduce our rate of domestic violence.

We will connect more residents, and their loved ones, who face challenges with addictions and mental health, with resources that really help.

Thank you for your support during the campaign.  Thank you for your support now!

Viva!
❤ Felicia
www.chewfortucson.wordpress.com

December 1, 2017 – First Fridays with Felicia

Thanks for coming out tonight to join me at First Fridays with Felicia. Thank you for sharing stories — accomplishments, challenges, hopes, and resources.

Highlights included a visit from Santa, enjoying homemade hummus, and sharing streudal and wine.

Celebrations include, a birthday, a 501(c)4, being connected with one another.

Our stories demonstrated the desire to bridge the gaps that exist in #OurTucson —
1. The need for policies for all people.
2. The desire for our children to have stories that grow them into good people.
3. The need for U of A students to vote (in Tucson).
4. The need for for tweens and teens to have something to do in Tucson.
5. The need for transportation system that is equitable for people, regardless of physical and mental capabilities.
6. The need for more responsive and attentive local government.
7. The hope for a teen center in Tucson.
8. The hope for more gun sense in America.
9. The hope for a more sustainable Tucson.
10. The need for more conversations and mindfulness.

I look forward to next month’s First Fridays with Felicia.

I say “Viva!” You say “La revolucion!”

Viva!
❤ Felicia